From ancient beginnings...

Just outside the popular town of Pézenas, and surrounded by vineyards that stretch to the pretty village of Alignan, the Seigneurie de Peyrat is one of the Languedoc’s oldest and most respected vineyard châteaux. Dating back to Roman times, the château that exists now was constructed in the 17th century, long before the ‘wine rush’ of the 19th century that ushered in most of the region’s other chateaux.

At the heart of this exceptional setting, the Viennet-Espada family perpetuates a refined lifestyle, one that is close to nature and that combines tradition, innovation and passion.

The Seigneurie de Peyrat was honored to host 'The Sun King' Louis XIV and Cardinal Mazarin in 1660, and you are now invited to discover this unique place that is so steeped in history, to savour our elegant collection of wines, and experience what we call 'Noble Plaisir'.



“Our hostess was just amazing and super friendly. A great day out!”
- Mlambros42, Johannesburg, South Africa

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...to a modern wine and tourism estate

Plans are afoot to transform the estate into an upmarket centre for local tourism, with luxury accommodation, a large events space and a truffle forest and vegetable garden to be built in the grounds.

Tours of the estate have proved very popular and they take in the château itself, its stunning 17th century chapel with fresco-walls, stately gardens, and of course the fascinating wine-making facilities. Cécile, the chief wine-maker, explains the process of wine-making in a simple, friendly way.

The estate’s wine boutique plays host to regular tastings. And the courtyard in summer sees ‘Pique-nique Chic’ wine and French tapas every afternoon.

Many more events are planed, such as evening wine apéros with Jazz and regional canapés and events centred around local black truffles. And the estate can now accommodate weddings, seminars and any other type of private event.

chateau oak-forest vineyard falconry-gallery winery shop future-events-space entrance

One of the region’s leading wine domains

The estate has steadily built up a repulation as one of the finest wine-makers in Languedoc, with a wide range of delicious wines that are highly respected by wine experts. The vineyards cover XX hectares, and 16 different types of grape are grown here.

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“The old estate of Seigneurie de Peyrat, just outside Pézenas, is rather like a sleeping giant that is beginning to wake up.”
- Rosemary George, Master of Wine, Roujan

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SYRAH

In hot climates (such as Languedoc, Crete, and the Barossa Valley of Australia), Syrah is more consistently full-bodied with softer tannin, jammier fruit and spice notes of liquorice, anise and earthy leather.

VIOGNIER

Like Chardonnay, Viognier has the potential to produce full-bodied wines with a lush, soft character. In contrast to Chardonnay, the Viognier varietal has more natural aromatics that include notes of peach, pears, violets and minerality

CALADOC

Caladoc grapes have high phenolic levels that produce wines with significant tannins levels and dark red colors. In blends the grape can contribute to the aroma of the wine, sharing many of the same fruity and spicy aromas as its parent grapes.

CINSAUT

Cinsault is a red wine grape, whose heat tolerance and productivity make it important in the Languedoc-Roussillon region and the former French colonies of Algeria and Morocco. It is often blended with grapes such as Grenache and Carignan to add softness and bouquet.

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

The classic profile of Cabernet Sauvignon tends to be full-bodied wines with high tannins and noticeable acidity that contributes to the wine's aging potential. In very hot climates the currant flavors can veer towards the over-ripe and "jammy" side.

SAUVIGNON BLANC

Sauvignon Blanc is planted in many of the world's wine regions, producing a crisp, dry, and refreshing white varietal wine. Depending on the climate, the flavor can range from aggressively grassy to sweetly tropical.

GRENACHE

Grenache is generally spicy, berry-flavored and soft on the palate and produces wine with a relatively high alcohol content, but it needs careful control of yields for best results. Characteristic flavor profiles include red fruit flavors (raspberry and strawberry) with a subtle, white pepper spice note.

VERMENTINO

Vermentino is a light-skinned wine grape variety, primarily found in Italian wine. What’s exciting about Vermentino is it can be deliciously complex in taste in similar style to Sauvignon Blanc.

PINOT NOIR

Pinot Noir is widely considered to produce some of the finest wines in the world, but is a difficult variety to cultivate and transform into wine. As the wines age, Pinots have the potential to develop vegetal and "barnyard" aromas that can contribute to the complexity of the wine.

CINSAUT

Cinsault is a red wine grape, whose heat tolerance and productivity make it important in the Languedoc-Roussillon region and the former French colonies of Algeria and Morocco. It is often blended with grapes such as Grenache and Carignan to add softness and bouquet.

COLAMBARD

Colombard is known for its neutrality, which makes it well suited to blending, although in the past few decades it has been used to make light, refreshing white wines in South West France.

CHARDONNAY

The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. It is vinified in many different styles, from the lean, crisply mineral wines of Chablis, France, to New World wines with oak, and tropical fruit flavors.

SAUVIGNON BLANC

Sauvignon Blanc is planted in many of the world's wine regions, producing a crisp, dry, and refreshing white varietal wine. Depending on the climate, the flavor can range from aggressively grassy to sweetly tropical.

CHARDONNAY

The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. It is vinified in many different styles, from the lean, crisply mineral wines of Chablis, France, to New World wines with oak, and tropical fruit flavors.

MERLOT

Merlot is a dark blue-colored wine grape variety, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. Its softness and "fleshiness", combined with its earlier ripening, makes Merlot a popular grape for blending with the sterner, later-ripening Cabernet Sauvignon.

SANGIOVESE

While not as aromatic as other red wine varieties such as Pinot noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah, Sangiovese often has a flavour profile of sour red cherries with earthy aromas and tea leaf notes.

ROUSSANNE

Roussanne is a white wine grape grown originally in the Rhône wine region in France. The aroma of Roussanne is often reminiscent of a flowery herbal tea. In warm climates, it produces wines of richness, with flavors of honey and pear, and full body.

CHARDONNAY

The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. It is vinified in many different styles, from the lean, crisply mineral wines of Chablis, France, to New World wines with oak, and tropical fruit flavors.

CHARDONNAY

The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. It is vinified in many different styles, from the lean, crisply mineral wines of Chablis, France, to New World wines with oak, and tropical fruit flavors.

VIOGNIER

Like Chardonnay, Viognier has the potential to produce full-bodied wines with a lush, soft character. In contrast to Chardonnay, the Viognier varietal has more natural aromatics that include notes of peach, pears, violets and minerality.

VIOGNIER

Like Chardonnay, Viognier has the potential to produce full-bodied wines with a lush, soft character. In contrast to Chardonnay, the Viognier varietal has more natural aromatics that include notes of peach, pears, violets and minerality.

MERLOT

Merlot is a dark blue-colored wine grape variety, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. Its softness and "fleshiness", combined with its earlier ripening, makes Merlot a popular grape for blending with the sterner, later-ripening Cabernet Sauvignon.

GRENACHE

Grenache is generally spicy, berry-flavored and soft on the palate and produces wine with a relatively high alcohol content, but it needs careful control of yields for best results. Characteristic flavor profiles include red fruit flavors (raspberry and strawberry) with a subtle, white pepper spice note.

SYRAH

In hot climates (such as Languedoc, Crete, and the Barossa Valley of Australia), Syrah is more consistently full-bodied with softer tannin, jammier fruit and spice notes of liquorice, anise and earthy leather.

COLAMBARD

Colombard is known for its neutrality, which makes it well suited to blending, although in the past few decades it has been used to make light, refreshing white wines in South West France.

SYRAH

In hot climates (such as Languedoc, Crete, and the Barossa Valley of Australia), Syrah is more consistently full-bodied with softer tannin, jammier fruit and spice notes of liquorice, anise and earthy leather.

OAK FOREST

Our beautiful and atmospheric Mediterranean Oak Forest is home to an aviary filled with chatty Lorikeets that you can feed. There’s also a small petting zoo, and plenty of fun spaces in which to have a picnic.

THE CHATEAU

The Château, built in the 17th century, houses stately reception rooms used for special events as well as the estate wine-producing facilities.

One of Languedoc’s oldest châteaux

The Seigneurie de Peyrat, formerly known as Montplaisir, was a “villa” in the Gallo-Roman period. Although you can still find a vaulted room where barrels were previously stored from the Middle Ages, the current buildings date back mainly to the 17th century. Seigneurie de Peyrat has been linked to the wine and has exploited the same land for over four centuries. The magnificent buildings are arranged around two courtyards and lie at the bottom of a wooded valley.

The Peyrat family - 17th century

The Peyrat family arrived in Montplaisir in 1645, when Etienne de Peyrat bought the estate from the daughter of Marquis de Carlencas, wife of François Cailloux, Seigneur d’Erignac, lieutenant-General of the province of Languedoc. Etienne de Peyrat was the descendant of a noble family which during the fifteenth century controlled one of the five gates into the town of Pézenas -The Saint Christol Gate- from which the tower now known as “Peyrat” originated- the only medieval tower that survived in Pézenas.

In the seventeenth century, the Peyrat family who had their “summer house” in Montplaisir lived in the Connetable de Montmorency Hôtel in Pézenas, nowadays the home of Pézenas tourism office called Hôtel de Peyrat.

We can note that on the 6th of April 1660, Louis XIV stayed at Etienne de Peyrat’s home during his visit to Pézenas. A cross mentioning the passage of Louis XIV was also placed on one of the pathways within Seigneurie de Peyrat (La Croix du Roix lien à télécharger). The same year, Cardinal Mazarin was also the host of Mr. Peyrat.

In the 17th century, the Montplaisir house was embellished: a stone staircase leading down to the gardens was added, large frescoes of Saints were painted over the walls of the chapel.

The Reboul & Juvenel Families – 18th & 19th century

At the end of the 17th century, Montplaisir was sold to the Reboul family. From this moment, Montplaisir took the name of its former owners and became known as Peyrat.

The Reboul family was a powerful bourgeois family that made fortune by trading. They were Jansenists and against displaying any sign of ostentation. They therefore lowered the towers as they considered the façade to be too ornate for their austere taste.

Henri Reboul (1763-1839) implemented new methods of vine cultivation on the Domain. He was a collector of precious manuscripts and paintings, associated to scientists and artists, friend of Lavoisier, he emigrated for a while to America and Rome before coming back to Pézenas. He created large chemical workshops and obtained a “patent of invention” for his wine fortification process.

In 1837, the property was assigned to Marie Reboul who married Henri de Juvenel in 1840. The Juvenel family, an old family from Pézenas preferred to live in Montpezat, a castle located on the other side of the river Peyne. In 1907, Pierre and Xavier de Juvenel sold Peyrat and its land to Mr. Fajon.

Gustave Fayet and its descendants – 20th & 21st century

In 1910, Gustave Fayet acquired the property. He was known as a vineyards owner, as well as an artist and a collector of paintings. He had a great collection of Gauguin, Redon, Van Gogh, Picasso.. and restored the Abbey of Frontfroide which is located in Narbonne.

In the 1980s, his grand grand son Luc Viennet and his wife Béatrice undertook the task of restructuring the vineyard. Since 2010, Cécile Viennet and her husband Miguel Espada, the fifth generation, are managing the estate and its 170 hectares of land.

Philosopy

We strive to cultivate our vines, olives trees and vegetable garden in a simple and traditional way, paying respect to the land, animals and the Mediterranean climate.

If a wild fig has more taste than a fig from intensive farming, it means that the first, although smaller and less attractive to the eye, has grown naturally. It contains the quintessence of its aromas, while the second, controlled by man, its character is diluted in favour of aesthetics. This is identical for grapes.

To make an expressive wine, the grapes must have flavor and taste. All our work is aimed in this direction. Thanks to the ways of our culture we have the satisfaction of harvesting a healthy and balanced grape, intrinsically capable of producing a wine of great quality.

Thus chemical fertilizers are replaced by organic compost, which maintains a humus and micro-biological balance of the soil. Treatments are minimized, the natural soil nutrition strengthens the natural resistance of vines. This approach avoids the escalating chemical treatment processes which radically destroy parasites, but by imbalance it may cause the rise of other forms of parasites.

The wildlife at Peyrat, partridges and rabbits, bees and grasshoppers, wild boar and deer thrive and reproduce.



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